http://www.uwplatt.edu/biology

Department Chair: Kristopher Wright
Office: 238 Gardner Hall
Phone: 608.342.1689
E-mail: wrightk@uwplatt.edu

Majors

Biology Major (non-emphasis)
Biology Comprehensive Major (includes emphasis)

  • Biohealth/Physiology Emphasis
  • Botany Emphasis
  • Cytotechnology Emphasis
  • Ecology Emphasis
  • Molecular/Genetics Emphasis
  • Secondary Education Emphasis
  • Zoology Emphasis

Minors

Biology (Non-Teaching)
Biology (Teaching)
Biotechnology

Pre-Professional Programs

Pre-Chiropractic
Pre-Cytotechnology
Pre-Dentistry
Pre-Medical Technology
Pre-Medicine
Pre-Nursing
Pre-Occupational Therapy
Pre-Optometry
Pre-Osteopathy
Pre-Physical Therapy
Pre-Physician Assistant
Pre-Podiatry

Purpose Statement

The UW-Platteville Biology Program provides biology students a fundamental knowledge of biology along with introducing students to the major areas in biology, and providing opportunities to explore these areas. In this endeavor, the program provides students the ability to critically apply biological concepts to the understanding of natural phenomena and to deal with biology-related health, societal and conservation issues. In addition, the UW-Platteville Biology Program prepares students for: advanced study and research in the biological and related sciences, healthcare professional programs, veterinary professional programs, careers in education and biology-related industry and governmental service. The biology program also provides courses for general education in the natural sciences to introduce students to science, biology, biological concepts and how these affect society. Finally, the biology program provides courses to support other university programs such as agriculture, education, physical education, chemistry, criminal justice and engineering.

Student Learning Goals

  1. Our world is filled with a dazzling array of life; these seemingly unique and different organisms have shared features due to their common origin. Our biology majors will demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics that unify all living organisms, the forces that shape their diversity, and the structures and functions inherent to different living organisms.
  2. Because science is a process used to explore and understand the world around us, our biology majors will observe, question, hypothesize, test, analyze and develop conclusions about natural phenomena.
  3. Life is complex; understanding this complexity requires interdisciplinary training. As they investigate the natural world, our biology majors will appropriately integrate knowledge and skills from chemistry, mathematics, and other liberal arts and sciences.
  4. Although some contributions to science are achieved by individual effort alone, others are accomplished when people with diverse perspectives and skills work together. Our biology majors will engage in scientific inquiry both as individuals and as effective team members.
  5. Without communication, science has no impact. Our biology majors will use a variety of oral and written means to convey information to a wide range of audiences.
  6. The advancement of scientific knowledge happens within a societal context. Our biology majors will evaluate interactions between science and society and the ethical issues surrounding those interactions.

Cultivating Attitudes

The members of our department feel that correct attitudes, as with any endeavor, provide an important complement to a sound knowledge base and skill-set. As a department, we hope to instill in our students a set of attitudes that we feel are important for all biologists. We will do our best to model the following: enthusiasm for the science of biology and an appreciation for the multitude of ways that biology permeates our society; a strong curiosity for the world about us; a respect for the instruments and objects of our research; integrity, because without integrity, there is no trust of the individual and, taken to its natural ends, no trust in the field of biology and the process of science.

Biology Requirements and Academic Standards

Eligibility for the Biology Comprehensive Major

Any student (new college student, external or internal transfer student) may declare a Biology Major (Non-emphasis) upon entering the program. Students may select an emphasis and pursue a Biology Comprehensive Major only after earning a C- or better in the following foundational courses (or their equivalents): BIOLOGY 1020, BIOLOGY 1650, and BIOLOGY 1750. Students who have specific biology interests, plan on a particular biology career, or those who plan to enter a graduate or professional school generally pursue the Biology Comprehensive Major with an area emphasis, thereby focusing their educational experiences. Students who seek a wider range of biology experiences than defined by an emphasis area may elect to not choose an emphasis area, and instead create their own set of electives that better align with their current or future interests.

Eligibility for select Pre-Professional Programs

Enrollment in the pre-Nursing option is open to any entering student (or internal transfer student). To declare any other option, a student must be eligible for pursuing the Biology Comprehensive Major and must have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0. If a student’s overall GPA drops below a 3.0, he or she will automatically be removed from the Pre-Professional Program; if this occurs, a student may appeal one time to the department for reenrollment in the Pre-Professional Program.

Program Grade Requirements

A grade of C- or higher is required in all biology courses counted toward a major in biology. Also, a grade of C- or higher is required in ENGLISH 1130, ENGLISH 1230, CHEMSTRY 1140, CHEMSTRY 1240 and MATH 1830.

Prerequisite Courses

In order to maintain enrollment in any biology course with identified prerequisite requirements, a student must successfully complete the required prerequisite(s). Students that register for a biology course that includes prerequisite requirements will be automatically un-enrolled in the course if they do not successfully complete the prerequisites.

Biology Requirements

ALL biology majors must complete core courses in the following three areas:

Required Biology Core Courses
BIOLOGY 1020BioQuest: Foundations for College Success1
BIOLOGY 1650The Unity of Life5
BIOLOGY 1750The Diversity of Life5
BIOLOGY 2420Fundamentals of Biological Investigations3
BIOLOGY 3330Genetics3
BIOLOGY 3450Ecology and Evolution3
Required Biology Capstone Experience
BIOLOGY 4970Senior Thesis1
or BIOLOGY 4990 Capstone Course: From Atoms to Ecosystems - The Study of Life
Required Supporting Courses
CHEMSTRY 1140General Chemistry I4
CHEMSTRY 1240General Chemistry4
MATH 1830Elementary Statistics3
Total Credits32

Students who expect to enter graduate or professional school should consider taking the following courses, beyond the requirements for the major that meet the needs of their respective interest areas:

MATH 2640Calculus and Analytic Geometry I4
CHEMSTRY 3540
CHEMSTRY 3510
Organic Chemistry Lecture
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
5
CHEMSTRY 3630
CHEMSTRY 3610
Organic Chemistry Lecture
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
4
CHEMSTRY 4630
CHEMSTRY 4610
General Biochemistry
and General Biochemistry Lab
4
PHYSICS 1050Principles of Physics5
PHYSICS 1350Introductory Physics I5
PHYSICS 1450Introductory Physics II5
PSYCHLGY 1130General Psychology3
SOCIOLGY 1130Introduction to Anthropology3
PHLSPHY(courses in philosophy)

Pre-Professional Programs

The following pre-professional programs are administered and advised through the UW-Platteville Biology Department:

Pre-Chiropractic

Jeff Huebschman
243 Gardner
608.342.1742

Pre-Cytotechnology

Ryan Haasl
338 Gardner
608.342.7330

Pre-Dentistry

Rich Dhyanchand
340 Gardner
608.342.6155

Pre-Medical Technology

Ryan Haasl
338 Gardner
608.342.7330

Pre-Medicine

Rich Dhyanchand
340 Gardner
608.342.6155

Pre-Nursing

Amanda Trewin
241 Gardner
608.342.1527

Pre-Occupational Therapy

Marilyn Tufte
253 Gardner
608.342.1664

Pre-Optometry

Rich Dhyanchand
340 Gardner
608.342.6155

Pre-Osteopathy

Amanda Trewin
241 Gardner
608.342.1527

Pre-Physical Therapy

Marilyn Tufte
253 Gardner
608.342.1664

Pre-Physician Assistant

Rich Dhyanchand
340 Gardner
608.342.6155

Pre-Podiatry

Amanda Trewin
241 Gardner
608.342.1527

Majors

  • Biology Comprehensive Major, B.S.
    • Biohealth/Physiology Emphasis
    • Botany Emphasis
    • Cytotechnology Emphasis
    • Ecology Emphasis
    • Molecular/Genetics Emphasis
    • Secondary Education Emphasis
    • Zoology Emphasis

BIOLOGY 1020 BioQuest: Foundations for College Success 1 Credit

This course provides an opportunity for new students to learn about the biology program, staff, and resources available at UW-Platteville. Designed to help first-year biology students make a successful transition to college life, students will be given opportunities to develop skills to excel in and beyond college. Topics include: time management, learning styles, study and test-taking skills, responsibility and professionalism, the importance of biology-related experiences and jobs before graduation, use of electronic academic tools, curriculum requirements and registration issues, balance in life, and effective communication.
Components: Class
GE: Entry Level requirement
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: Biology or related major
Typically Offered: Fall

BIOLOGY 1150 General Biology 5 Credits

The fundamental features of living organisms; cell and tissue structure, growth, basic physiological processes, reproduction and inheritance, classification, ecology, and evolution. Not required nor counted toward a major or a minor in biology.
Components: Laboratory, Class
GE: Natural Science
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

BIOLOGY 1350 General Botany 5 Credits

Structures and functions of principal groups of plants and plant like organisms; their ecological and phylogenetic relationships.
Components: Laboratory, Class
GE: Natural Science
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 1650 The Unity of Life 5 Credits

This course is a dynamic exploration of Biology from the biochemical level through the individual organism. In this exploration students will investigate the interactions of the internal workings of the cell, the cells themselves, tissues and organ systems in the physiology of organisms from single celled bacteria through multi-cellular plants and animals.
Components: Laboratory, Class
GE: Natural Science
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: Biology or related major and MATH 15 with a grade of "C" or better or mathematics proficiency level of 15 or above and English 0010 with a grade of "C" or better or an English placement level of English 1130
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 1750 The Diversity of Life 5 Credits

In this course the ecological and evolutionary connections between all living organisms will e explored and the following questions will be addressed: 1) Why are there so many species and how did there get to be so many? 2) How does fitness unify and diversify life? 3) How do organisms reproduce? and 4) What is the biological future of life? Organismal through ecosystem level processes will be explored.
Components: Laboratory, Class
GE: Natural Science
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: Biology or related major and MATH 15 with a grade of "C" or better or mathematics proficiency level of 15 or above and English 0010 with a grade of "C" or better or an English placement level of English 1130
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 2040 Cell Biology 4 Credits

Organization of cells and their components; analysis of light and electron microscopy of cytoplasmic and nuclear components of the cell and their relation to heredity, physiology, reproduction and development.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and one semester of chemistry
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 2130 Plants and Society 3 Credits

A global exploration of plants and their uses by humans from historical, cultural, economic, and botanical perspectives.
Components: Laboratory, Class
GE: International Education
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1150 or BIOLOGY 1350 or BIOLOGY 1650 or BIOLOGY 1750
Typically Offered: Spring

BIOLOGY 2140 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 5 Credits

Designed as the first of a two-semester sequence, this sequence explores structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) of the human body from a systematic approach. In addition to introductory materials, this semester includes study of the integumentary system, nervous system including special senses, endocrine system and skeletal system. Throughout the semester, systems will be analyzed at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and organ system levels. This course is designed for science majors.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1150 or BIOLOGY 1650 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall

BIOLOGY 2240 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 5 Credits

Designed as the 2nd of a two-semester sequence, this course continues the exploration of the structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) of the human body from a systematic approach. This semester includes the study of the muscular system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, reproductive system and early development. Throughout the semester systems will be analyzed at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and organ system levels. This course is designed for science majors.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 2140 (grade of "C-" or better required)
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 2340 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology 4 Credits

As a one semester offering, this course is designed to cover the essentials of human anatomy and physiology. It will serve as a basic introduction to the study of the complex interdependence of structure and function from a systematic approach. All primary body systems will be addressed.
Components: Laboratory, Class
GE: Natural Science
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

BIOLOGY 2420 Fundamentals of Biological Investigations 3 Credits

This course illustrates the process of science from a biological perspective. Students will learn to design, execute, analyze, and present biological research. Through a combination of readings, discussions, projects, lab exercises, and field work students will experience the challenges and rewards of acquiring biological information.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and ENGLISH 1130 and ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 242W Fundamentals of Biological Investigations 3 Credits

A WRITING EMPHASIS COURSE IS DESIGNED TO EFFECTIVELY USE WRITING TO ENHANCE STUDENT LEARNING OF COURSE SPECIFIC CONTENT THROUGH VARIOUS MEANS SUCH AS SELF-REFLECTION, ANALYSIS, PROBLEM SOLVING AND RESEARCH. This course illustrates the process of science from a biological perspective. Students will learn to design, execute, analyze, and present biological research. Through a combination of readings, discussions, projects, lab exercises, and field work students will experience the challenges and rewards of acquiring biological information.
Components: Laboratory, Class
GE: Writing Emphasis
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and ENGLISH 1130 and ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 2450 Fungi, Algae and Bryophytes 4 Credits

This course covers the major groups of living algae, fungi, fungal-like protists, and bryophytes. Although classic concepts of taxonomy, evolution, morphology, and ecological and economic importances will be included in this diversity survey course, the material will be presented from a community ecology approach: which organisms would be located in a particular environment and why? Lectures will be standard lecture as well as discussion format. Labs will include a variety of essential techniques for studying these diverse organisms, such as microscopy, use of identification keys, field sampling, collection/processing, and culturing.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1350 or (BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750). C: SPEECH 1010, BIOLOGY 3450 recommended
Typically Offered: Fall-ODD

BIOLOGY 2640 Invertebrate Zoology 5 Credits

Systematic survey of the invertebrates. Both representative and diverse forms will be studied within each group. Includes animal micro-technique procedures.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

BIOLOGY 2920 Research Experience 1-3 Credits

Individual specialized study working with a faculty advisor. For freshmen, sophomores, and those students who have yet to complete BIOLOGY 2420. Up to two credits can be counted toward a biology major.
Components: Research
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 3030 Ornithology 4 Credits

Anatomy, physiology, life histories, and ecology of birds. Laboratory study and field trips emphasize identification of local species.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

BIOLOGY 3040 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 5 Credits

Comparative studies of organs and systems of Vertebrata; includes laboratory dissections of shark, necturus, and cat.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and (BIOLOGY 2140 and BIOLOGY 2240) or (BIOLOGY 2340) or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall

BIOLOGY 3120 Animal Tissue Culture 2 Credits

Preparation of equipment and environment. Growth and maintenance. Media considerations. Various types of culture methods. Applications.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and one college level chemistry course or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

BIOLOGY 3230 Mammalogy 4 Credits

A review of the mammalian fauna focusing on the major orders and families. Key morphological features, life history, and zoogeographic patterns will be reviewed for major groups. Discussion of current conservation and management issues. Lab includes identification of native Wisconsin mammals and an introduction to standard field and lab techniques for the study of mammals.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall

BIOLOGY 3240 Microbiology 5 Credits

Classification, morphology, physiology, and genetics of microbes; relation of bacteria to viruses; survey of bacteria found in the environment and their control; principles of immunity and diseases.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and CHEMSTRY 1140 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 3330 Genetics 3 Credits

This course explores what genes are, how they are expressed, and how they are passed on from generation to generation. In addition, applications of genetics in relation to mutation, disease, gene therapy, criminalistics and genetic engineering are also explored.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 3450 Ecology and Evolution 3 Credits

Ecology and evolution will be considered from the perspectives of individual organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems in an effort to illustrate the relationships between these concepts and the importance of how they both shape our world. Students will be introduced to the history, major principles, theories, dynamics, and approaches of ecology and evolution. (Fall, Spring)
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 3460 Ecological Methods and Research 3 Credits

This class supplements BIOLOGY 3450 Ecology and Evolution and further explores the major principles, techniques, and approaches in ecology. This course will explore ecology in the field and laboratory with the goal of enabling students to plan, execute, and scrutinize ecological research and appreciate how science and research fit into ecology.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420; C: BIOLOGY 3450 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall

BIOLOGY 3530 Biotechnology 3 Credits

Genetic elements that control gene expression. Procedures for creating and isolating cloned genes. Genetic engineering and uses of recombinant DNA.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and one college level chemistry course or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall

BIOLOGY 3550 Morphology and Evolution of Vascular Plants 4 Credits

This broad course covers the structure or form (morphology) of the adult plant, its tissues, development and reproductive details, as well as the ecology, evolutionary history, and taxonomy of the group in which it is classified. Focus will be given to all phyla of extant vascular plants and major groups of extinct vascular plants, presenting the organisms from an evolutionary perspective.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1350 or (BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750)
Typically Offered: Spring-ODD

BIOLOGY 3620 Immunology 2 Credits

The basic concepts of immunology. The normal and abnormal immune response.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and one college level chemistry course or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

BIOLOGY 3650 Plant Communities of Wisconsin 4 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the major plant communities of Wisconsin and neighboring states. It emphasizes the identification, biogeographic distribution, interrelationships, conservation and management of the major regional plant communities as well as their key plant species. Two extended weekend field trips are required.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and 1750 or BIOLOGY 1350 or consent of instructor; recommended: BIOLOGY 3450
Typically Offered: Fall

BIOLOGY 3750 Freshwater Biology 4 Credits

Examination of the physical components and biological communities of lakes, streams, and wetlands and the relationships between them. Integration of fieldwork, scientific literature, and laboratory analyses.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 and (CHEMSTRY 1050 or CHEMSTRY 1140) or consent of instructor, BIOLOGY 3450 recommended
Typically Offered: Fall-EVEN

BIOLOGY 3920 Personalized Learning Experience 1-3 Credits

Alternative learning experiences that fall in between independent research and the traditional classroom. This involves working with a faculty/staff advisor to determine objectives, expectations, and assessments. Up to two credits can be counted toward a biology major.
Components: Independent Study
Typically Offered: All

BIOLOGY 4010 Workshop in Biology 1 Credit

Varying topics. Does not count toward major or minor in Biology or minor in Biotechnology.
Components: Class
Typically Offered: Occasional

BIOLOGY 4040 Molecular Biology 5 Credits

Detailed structural analysis of the biological molecules DNA, RNA, and proteins in relation to cellular processes. Exploration of experimental approaches that explain the molecular basis for all life activities.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 and BIOLOGY 2040 and BIOLOGY 3330 and one semester of chemistry or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

BIOLOGY 4130 Mammalian Endocrinology 3 Credits

The structural and functional classification of hormones, principles of hormone action, and the regulation of body functions by the endocrine system with emphasis on homeostasis.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 or AGSCI 4110 and BIOLOGY 2420 CHEMSTRY 1240 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

BIOLOGY 4150 Forensic Botany 4 Credits

A survey of the structures of plants, fungi, and algae that can be used as botanical evidence in criminal investigation. Discussion of current literature, legal issues and future trends. Laboratory includes microtechnique, sample collection and preservation techniques, and testing methods.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1150 or BIOLOGY 1350 or BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 or consent of instructor; recommended: BIOLOGY 2450 and BIOLOGY 3550
Typically Offered: Fall-EVEN

BIOLOGY 4240 Advanced Physiology 5 Credits

In depth study of physiologic processes from molecular to organismic level. Approached from a topical format, emphasizing recent advancements.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 and BIOLOGY 2140 or BIOLOGY 2340 and CHEMSTRY 1240 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall

BIOLOGY 4340 Mammalian Histology 4 Credits

The organization of cells and their products to form tissues and organs; morphological and functional comparisons of tissue organization of representatives from the class Mammalia.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Occasional

BIOLOGY 4410 Topics in Biology 1-3 Credits

Presentations of biological topics.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Summer

BIOLOGY 4440 Human Gross Anatomy 4 Credits

There is nothing more fascinating than learning about the human body. Its structure, organization and physiology are of interest from a personal health and clinical standpoint. This course will provide the opportunity for advanced students to engage in an intense study of human gross anatomy. This course will have a significant lab component where students will apply concepts of anatomy and physiology to the prosected human cadaver.
Components: Laboratory
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 and (BIOLOGY 2140 and BIOLOGY 2240) or BIOLOGY 2340 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Fall

BIOLOGY 4520 Biotechnology Seminar 2 Credits

Selected topics from among recent advances in biotechnology.
Components: Seminar
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 and BIOLOGY 3530 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

BIOLOGY 4530 Plant Pathology 3 Credits

This course covers the major aspects of plant disease including abiotic and biotic causes, disease and symptom recognition, how disease occurs, and methods and techniques for prevention and control.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Cross Offering: SCSCI 4530
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1350 (or BIOLOGY 1650 BIOLOGY 1750) BIOLOGY 2420 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

BIOLOGY 4660 Biology Internship Experience 1-8 Credits

Enhancement of the educational experience through placement of a student with a cooperating agency, business, industry, or institution. The nature of the assignment, type of experience, number of credits, and evaluation procedure to be stipulated in a statement of agreement (learning contract) between the student and department. Does not count toward a major or a minor in biology.
Components: Field Studies
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

BIOLOGY 4710 Selected Regional Habitats 1-3 Credits

Offers a first-hand introduction to the flora and fauna of selected unusual habitats in the form of an interim field trip. Up to three credits can be counted toward a biology major.
Components: Field Studies
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Winter

BIOLOGY 4920 Independent Research in Biology 1-3 Credits

Individual specialized study.
Components: Independent Study
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BIOLOGY 1650 and BIOLOGY 1750 and BIOLOGY 2420 and approval of the biology department chairperson and faculty advisor before registration.
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

BIOLOGY 4970 Senior Thesis 1 Credit

This course provides students a unique, "capstone" opportunity to conduct research in collaboration with their peers and integrate knowledge from the different areas of biology. With assistance from a faculty coordinator, students from all areas of biology will work together to complete their individual independent research projects. Students will produce a manuscript-quality report and make a formal presentation on their research.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: Biology major with senior standing and BIOLOGY 4920
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

BIOLOGY 4990 Capstone Course: From Atoms to Ecosystems - The Study of Life 1 Credit

This course is an exciting opportunity for students to integrate knowledge from the different areas of biology and associated disciplines to an interrelated whole, the study of life. In this endeavor, students will be applying their knowledge to current scientific and bioethical issues in biology. Students will also explore and reflect on what it means to be a biologist.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: Biology major with senior standing
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

Additional information about the Faculty and Lecturers below may be found in the Faculty and Academic Staff section of this catalog.

Cornett, Catherine A.

Dhyanchand, Richard

Doyle-Morin, Rebecca

Frieders, Elizabeth M.

Grady, Benjamin R.

Haasl, Ryan

Huebschman, Jeffrey J.

Klavins, Sharon D.

Neuwald, Anuschka

Peterson, John

Schmitz, Ryan T.

Sifri, Nadia

Stankovich, Wendy S.

Trewin, Amanda L.

Tufte, Marilyn J.

Weber, Wayne C.

Wright, Kristopher K.