http://www.uwplatt.edu/ethnic-studies

Director: Frank King
Office: 246 Gardner Hall
Phone: 608.342.7343
E-mail: kingf@uwplatt.edu

Academic Department Associate: Marsha Weaver
Office: 261 Gardner Hall
Phone: 608.342.6060
E-mail: weaverma@uwplatt.edu

About the Ethnic Studies Program and Minor

The Ethnic Studies Program is dedicated to awakening the minds and spirits of students to the issues of race and ethnicity.  It engages students in the social realities and moral challenges of racism in the United States and around the world.  Ethnic Studies is an interdisciplinary discipline that forges strong scholarly and intellectual connections between History, Political Economy, Anthropology, and the related fields of Native American, African-American, Chicano/a, Asian-American, and Women and Gender Studies.  This program provides students with an analysis of the historical narratives of marginalized groups whose lived experiences are often neglected. 

Ethnic Studies was created out of student activism as students of color advocated for courses that reflected their lived experiences.  The discipline changed academia by challenging the Eurocentric framing of most programs, giving voice to communities underrepresented in education.  Because of student involvement in its formation, Ethnic Studies is dedicated to the development of critical thinking skills in students and encouraging political and social activism. 

The Ethnic Studies Program oversees the UW-Platteville curriculum requirement that every student in a degree program complete a 3 credit course on issues of race and ethnicity.  A Minor or Certificate in Ethnic Studies are available for 24 and 15 credits respectively.

WHY ETHNIC STUDIES?
Ethnic Studies programs are under heavy scrutiny at the grade school and college levels.  Critics tout that Ethnic Studies is divisive and exclusionary, yet numerous studies show that Ethnic Studies can benefit learning of all students.  Giving students a glimpse of the history and experiences of marginalized groups, we can dismantle the biases that support systemic oppression.  This not only enhances student learning, but increases graduation rates and college attendance.
Research also prove that individuals with experience in diversity are desired by businesses.  A minor in Ethnic Studies can open up even more career opportunities.  In a competitive job market individuals with Ethnic Studies minors will be equipped to better interact with diverse groups.  The critical thinking skills and cultural understandings are invaluable for the corporations, law enforcement, human resources, education, medical fields, and global organizations.

ETHNSTDY 1030 Race, Gender, and Class 3 Credits

An examination of the concepts of race, gender, and class in the United States as these influences are related historically to form a matrix that then serves as a comprehensive basis for understanding the contemporary American society.
Components: Class
GE: Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

ETHNSTDY 2050 Native American Music 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with an introductory overview of American Indian Music. Its purpose is to promote understanding of the cultures experiences through the study of both traditional and popular American Indian music, such as powwows, songs, flute music, and popular/classical artists. The awareness gained will be used to analyze social issues of identify, self-representation, authenticity, appropriation, sovereignty, and federal assimilation policies with the aim of guiding students toward a thoughtful perspective that challenges traditional and romanticized views of American Indian culture. By engaging with a culture distinct from their own, and gaining an understanding of the complex relationship of history, politics, beliefs, and musical systems contained therein, students will be charged to consider multiple perspectives and become more self-aware. Additionally, the course seeks to expose students to the evolution and complexities of the processes of ethnomusicology.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: MUSIC 2050
GE: Ethnic Studies, Fine Arts
Typically Offered: DEMAND

ETHNSTDY 2100 The History and Politics of Hip Hop 3 Credits

Hip Hop is America. Its only real crime is being so much so."--Ernest HardyHip Hop is not just a musical genre, but a cultural phenomenon that has influenced America and the entire world. Starting in Black and Latino communities, has since emerged into one of the largest musical institutions. Hip Hop culture is the voice of marginalized groups and first intended to be the primary news and educational source for the subaltern. Yet, aspects of the culture been appropriated and commodified, taking the educational and revolutionary aspect out of he culture. As Hip Hop artist Nas states, "Hip Hop is dead." But Hip Hop culture lives and transcends race, ethnicity, class, and gender. This class will analyze the origins of Hip Hop, its current political economy, and its global influence. Students will be able to fully understand what "culture" is and be able to interpret the key elements that defines Hip Hop culture. Students will also assess the significant ways Hip Hop has influenced American society. Most importantly, students will understand how the culture has been used as a pedagogical tool for the subaltern, as well as a spiritual and metaphysical model.
Components: Class
GE: Ethnic Studies
Typically Offered: Fall

ETHNSTDY 2130 The Native American Experience 3 Credits

The Native American Experience" is an examination of the indigenous peoples of North America with particular emphasis on the area now called the United States.
Components: Class
GE: Ethnic Studies, Humanities
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

ETHNSTDY 2200 Introduction to Ethnic Studies 3 Credits

An examination of the concepts, issues and experience of People of Color in the U.S. with emphasis on the historical and contemporary interaction of race, gender, and class within and external to communities of color.
Components: Class
GE: Ethnic Studies
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

ETHNSTDY 2230 Black Experience in the U. S. 3 Credits

The course will examine the development of Black culture in the U.S. and how slavery, social and political structures in the U.S. influenced the development of Black culture. We will also focus on various accounts of the nature of racial ideology, and the construction of racial identities.
Components: Class
GE: Ethnic Studies
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

ETHNSTDY 2480 Race and Ethnicity in Film 3 Credits

This course will offer students a lens through which to study the changing role of race and ethnicity in society and will explore how the film industry reflects and often participates in the larger racial inequities in cultural, economic, and artistic structures. The course will also introduce students to a wide range of films written or directed by persons of color and will consider the ways in which filmmakers have used film as a means of asserting ethnic identity and challenging the status quo. The course will primarily focus on films made within the United States, but it may also entail an international component.
Components: Discussion, Class
Cross Offering: ENGLISH 2480
GE: Ethnic Studies, Humanities
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: ENGLISH 1230 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered:

ETHNSTDY 2750 Native American Art 3 Credits

Art of various culture groups of American Indians, ranging from the Inuit of the far north to tribes and nations of the southwest. Ancient and traditional art forms will be studied as well as history of art in times of culture contact and conflict, continuing through work created by contemporary tribal artists informed by those traditions.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: ART 2750
GE: Ethnic Studies, Fine Arts
Typically Offered: Fall

ETHNSTDY 2830 Ethnicity, Race and Crime 3 Credits

A study of the correlation between ethnicity, race, crime and criminality in the United States. This course explores the interrelatedness of ethnicity, race, criminal law, and the sanctioning of criminal behavior in the United States.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: CRIMLJUS 2830
GE: Ethnic Studies
Prereqs/Coreqs: sophomore standing to enroll in this class
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

ETHNSTDY 2940 The Political Economy of Race, Gender and Ethnicity 3 Credits

This course uses economic principles to analyze salient issues involving people of color, women, and ethnic minorities. The focus is interdisciplinary, drawing from the fields of business, political science, and others. Pertinent principles and concepts are used to analyze causes and effects of the changing composition of U.S. families, to examine the nature and extent of discrimination within the U.S. economy, and to understand why issues involving race, ethnicity, and gender are of concern to us both individually and collectively.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: ECONOMIC 2940, POLISCI 2940
GE: Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

ETHNSTDY 2950 Intro to Multi-Ethnic American Literature 3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of ethnic American literatures, giving special emphasis to the four historically marginalized racial groups--Native American, African American, Asian American, and Latino/a. While close analysis of assigned literary texts will make up the bulk of class work, a number of historical and theoretical issues will also be examined. These include the social construction of race/ethnicity; racism and white privilege, literary sub-culture versus literary canon; and the intersection of gender and class with race and ethnicity.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: ENGLISH 2950
GE: Ethnic Studies, Humanities
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: (ENGLISH 1130 or ENGLISH 1040) and ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

ETHNSTDY 3010 Race, Gender, and United States Labor History 3 Credits

Social, cultural, and economic history of American working people from the colonial period to the present.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: HISTORY 3010
GE: Ethnic Studies, Historical Perspective
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: HISTORY 1330 or HISTORY 1430 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

ETHNSTDY 3170 Native America and Colonial Borderlands to 1887 3 Credits

The history of Native North America begins well-before Columbus arrived. Paleo-Indians struggled and thrived, cooperated and changed giving way to early-modern Native nations by 1000 BCE. After 1492 Native nations cooperated and clashed with each other and with competing European empires for control of land, labor, and resources. This story is not separate from the narrative of early American history as a whole, but examining it closely permits appreciation of First Nation worldviews, times of Pan-Indian cooperation, and moments of cooperation between American Indians, Europeans, and Africans on the borderlands of the Atlantic World.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: HISTORY 3170
GE: Ethnic Studies, Historical Perspective
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: HISTORY 1330 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: EVERY/4TH

ETHNSTDY 317W Native America and Colonial Borderlands to 1887 3 Credits

The history of Native North America begins well-before Columbus arrived. Paleo-Indians struggled and thrived, cooperated and changed giving way to early-modern Native nations by 1000 BCE. After 1492 Native nations cooperated and clashed with each other and with competing European empires for control of land, labor, and resources. This story is not separate from the narrative of early American history as a whole, but examining it closely permits appreciation of First Nation worldviews, times of Pan-Indian cooperation, and moments of cooperation between American Indians, Europeans, and Africans on the borderlands of the Atlantic World.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: HISTORY 317W
GE: Ethnic Studies, Historical Perspective, Writing Emphasis
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: HISTORY 1330 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered:

ETHNSTDY 3180 Native American History, What you thought you knew 3 Credits

The history of Native North America begins long before the Dawes Act of 1887. Native peoples have faced the challenges of the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries in significant ways. This story is not separate from the narrative of American history, but an integral part of it. Native Americans, including 20,000 veterans, recovered from the Civil War. Land policy, treaties, and tribal sovereignty continue to influence Native communities today. Tribal members have built skyscrapers, joined the Peace Corps, baffled code-breakers, and much more. First Nations identity continues to evolve as a central part of the American story.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: HISTORY 3180
GE: Ethnic Studies, Historical Perspective
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: HISTORY 1430 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: EVERY/4TH

ETHNSTDY 318W Native American History, What you thought you knew 3 Credits

The history of Native North America begins long before the Dawes Act of 1887. Native peoples have faced the challenges of the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries in significant ways. This story is not separate from the narrative of American history, but an integral part of it. Native Americans, including 20,000 veterans, recovered from the Civil War. Land policy, treaties, and tribal sovereignty continue to influence Native communities today. Tribal members have built skyscrapers, joined the Peace Corps, baffled code-breakers, and much more. First Nations identity continues to evolve as a central part of the American story.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: HISTORY 318W
GE: Ethnic Studies, Historical Perspective, Writing Emphasis
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: HISTORY 1430 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: EVERY/4TH

ETHNSTDY 3230 Social Inequalities 3 Credits

The course investigates the causes and consequences of social stratification based on race, gender, social class, and nationality. Students gain a better understanding of how inequality is produced through prejudice, discrimination, conflict, and social institutions such as the family, neighborhoods, educational system, labor markets, and criminal justice system.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: SOCIOLGY 3230
GE: Ethnic Studies, Social Sciences
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: SOCIOLGY 1030
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

ETHNSTDY 3240 African-American History 1619 to Present 3 Credits

The historical experience of African-Americans since 1619.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: HISTORY 3240
GE: Ethnic Studies, Historical Perspective
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: HISTORY 1330 or HISTORY 1430 or consent of instructor or department chair
Typically Offered: Fall

ETHNSTDY 3340 Management, Gender & Race 3 Credits

This course reviews the changing nature of management and explains why gender and race/ethnicity have become important concerns of business. It examines the status of women and people of color in managerial or administrative positions and discusses socialization processes, stereotypes, equal employment opportunity laws, diversity management, illegal harassment, and power in organizations. Networking, mentoring, work/life balance, and career planning also are addressed.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: BUSADMIN 3340, WOMGENDR 3340
GE: Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: BUSADMIN 2330 or AGBUS 1500 or junior standing
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

ETHNSTDY 3410 Chicano Literature 3 Credits

An examination of representative texts from various Chicana/Chicano writers, covering a range of genres and generations. There will be an emphasis on the relationship between literary production and historical context, in particular, the involvement of the writers in the social and political conflicts affecting the Chicano community.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: ENGLISH 3410
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: (ENGLISH 1130 or ENGLISH 1040) and ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Spring-EVEN

ETHNSTDY 3630 Ethnic and Gender Equity in Education 3 Credits

To increase an appreciation, understanding, and awareness of ethnic and gender equity issues in the educational process and in society. The student will view equity issues through research, historical, philosophical, sociological, and psychological perspectives and the implications that each arena has on the lives of all of us. (Field experience 25 hours)
Components: Discussion, Class
Cross Offering: TEACHING 3630, WOMGENDR 3630
GE: Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

ETHNSTDY 3720 Ethnic Rights and Politics 3 Credits

The course examines changing patterns of ethnic, gender and race relations; legislative and judicial developments affecting civil rights; political movements, political, social and economic discrimination; the judicial system and legal protection for civil rights and the status and circumstances of women and other minorities.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: POLISCI 3730
GE: Ethnic Studies, Social Sciences
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: POLISCI 1230 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

ETHNSTDY 3730 African-American Literature 3 Credits

A survey of African-American literature beginning in the ante bellum period and continuing to the present, including oral forms (folk tales and spirituals), novels, poetry, drama, autobiography, and other selected non-fiction.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: ENGLISH 3730
GE: Ethnic Studies, Humanities
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: (ENGLISH 1130 or ENGLISH 1040) and ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Spring

ETHNSTDY 3740 Asian American Literature 3 Credits

A survey of Asian-American literature beginning in the early 1900s and continuing to present times. Includes works of fiction, autobiography, poetry, and drama. Focuses on writers from different literary and oral traditions including (but not limited to) Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Hmong, Vietnamese, and Indian, and examines the impact of family, culture, and gender both within these traditions and between a particular tradition and U.S. popular culture.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: ENGLISH 3740
GE: Ethnic Studies, Humanities
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: (ENGLISH 1130 or ENGLISH 1040) and ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Fall

ETHNSTDY 3750 American Literature of Ethnicity and Immigration 3 Credits

An examination of literature from a variety of U.S. "racial" and "ethnic" groups, including African-, Italian-, Mexican-, Jewish-, Asian-, and Native-American. Emphasis will be placed on the meanings of "race" and "ethnicity," the effects of immigration, and the impact of gender in this literature.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: ENGLISH 3750
GE: Ethnic Studies, Humanities
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: (ENGLISH 1130 or ENGLISH 1040) and ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Fall

ETHNSTDY 3760 Wisconsin Indian Literature 3 Credits

An exploration of Wisconsin Indian literatures from the oral tradition to the present; texts studied will include epics, legends, poetry, novels, and selected non-fiction, including such writers as Mountain Wolf Woman, Louise Erdrich, and Susan Power.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: ENGLISH 3760
GE: Ethnic Studies, Humanities
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: (ENGLISH 1130 or ENGLISH 1040) and ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Fall

ETHNSTDY 3830 Black Women and Feminism in the U.S. 3 Credits

An interdisciplinary examination of the historical and contemporary relationship between black women in the United States and the feminist movement. Authors discussed may include Frances Harper, Ida Wells-Barnett, bell hooks, Audre Lorde, and others.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: WOMGENDR 3830
GE: Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies
Prereqs/Coreqs: sophomore standing to enroll in this class
Typically Offered: Fall

ETHNSTDY 4850 Multicultural Dramatic Literature 3 Credits

An in-depth survey of the rise and development of minority characters and themes in American theatre since the 20th Century. Particular emphasis will be placed on the dramatic literature and theatrical criticism and production since 1990.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: THEATRE 4850
GE: Ethnic Studies
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Occasional

ETHNSTDY 485W Multicultural Dramatic Literature 3 Credits

A WRITING EMPHASIS COURSE IS DESIGNED TO EFFECTIVELY USE WRITING TO ENHANCE STUDENT LEARNING OF COURSE SPECIFIC CONTENT THROUGH VARIOUS MEANS SUCH AS SELF-REFLECTION, ANALYSIS, PROBLEM SOLVING AND RESEARCH. An in-depth survey of the rise and development of minority characters and themes in American theatre since the 20th Century. Particular emphasis will be placed on the dramatic literature and theatrical criticism and production since 1990.
Components: Class
Cross Offering: THEATRE 485W
GE: Ethnic Studies, Writing Emphasis
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Occasional