http://www.uwplatt.edu/civil-environmental-engineering

Department Chair: Christina Curras
Office: 141A Ottensman Hall
Phone: 608.342.1544
E-mail: currasc@uwplatt.edu

Majors

Civil Engineering

  • Construction Engineering Emphasis
  • Geotechnical Engineering Emphasis
  • Environmental Engineering Emphasis
  • Structural Engineering Emphasis
  • Transportation Engineering Emphasis
  • Municipal Engineering Emphasis

Environmental Engineering

About the Department and Majors

The UW-Platteville Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers two bachelor of science degrees: civil engineering and environmental engineering. The civil engineering degree requirements include completion of one emphasis area: construction, environmental, municipal, structural, geotechnical or transportation. The environmental engineering degree requirements provide a background in all of the major areas of environmental engineering.

Civil Engineering

http://www.uwplatt.edu/civil-environmental-engineering

Contact: Christina Curras
Office: 141A Ottensman Hall
Phone: 608.342.1544
E-mail: currasc@uwplatt.edu

University of Wisconsin Platteville’s Civil Engineering program is accredited under the General Criteria by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

The UW-Platteville Civil Engineering Program gives students a broad background in all areas of civil engineering, while permitting specialization in the senior year. Practical applications are emphasized with sufficient theory so that the individual can grow with the future as new materials, methods and designs develop. Students gain hands-on experience in laboratories and in the field to prepare them to contribute immediately.

Civil engineers plan, design and supervise the infrastructure of civil society. The infrastructure includes highways that connect our nation’s cities, airports that serve travelers, bridges that span our rivers and harbors, dams and levees that control floods and supply water for cities, and wastewater treatment plants that protect the environment. Civil engineers also work with architects to design and supervise construction of buildings. The civil engineering design process begins with the accumulation and analysis of basic information about a project. This information may include the topography and geology for a highway; flood history of a river that must be bridged or dammed; population growth projections and water usage; laboratory analysis of construction materials; or pollution surveys of air, land and water. Using this information, civil engineers apply their knowledge of science and engineering design to meet a project’s requirements, assuring its successful completion.

Civil Engineering Degree Program Vision, Objectives and Outcomes

Vision

The vision of the UW-Platteville Civil Engineering Program is to provide the education and training to create citizen engineers who will be leaders in the civil and environmental engineering profession and in their communities.

Citizen engineers are:

  • Able to address technical and non-technical issues
  • Attuned to the needs of their community and nation
  • Able and willing to engage in public policy
  • Appreciative of sustainability
  • Ethical
  • Innovative, but aware of risk
  • Lifelong learners

Program Objectives

In order to achieve the vision of the UW-Platteville Civil Engineering Program, graduates of the program will:

  1. Effectively and accurately communicate with technical and non-technical audiences
  2. Successfully apply technical knowledge to solve engineering problems to satisfy client, industry and governmental requirements
  3. Have the ability to evaluate projects from a holistic perspective including some or all of the following: sustainability, environmental impacts, ethics, aesthetics, politics, historical perspectives, social impacts, technical needs and costs
  4. Make   significant   and   innovative   contributions   in   their professional endeavors
  5. Become registered professional engineers

The realization of these objectives is expected to occur within five years of graduation. In order to ensure that graduates are adequately prepared to meet these objectives, the civil and environmental engineering department program outcomes define the competencies that students are expected to demonstrate at graduation.

Program Outcomes

The following program outcomes are designed to produce graduates who will meet the program objectives:

a. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

b. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

c. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

d. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

e. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

f. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

g. an ability to communicate effectively

h. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engisneering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

i. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

j. a knowledge of contemporary issues

k. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Academic Standards

 

Program Requirements

A grade of “C-” or higher must be earned in all courses that are prerequisite courses for other CIVILENG courses. All 3000-level CIVILENG courses must be satisfactorily completed prior to enrolling in CIVILENG 4930.

General Requirements Bachelor of Science Degree

Total for graduation133
Major studies102

Environmental Engineering

http://www.uwplatt.edu/civil-environmental-engineering

Contact: Philip J. Parker, P.E.
Office: 131A Ottensman Hall
Phone: 608.342.1235
E-mail: parkerp@uwplatt.edu

University of Wisconsin Platteville’s Environmental Engineering program is accredited under the General Criteria by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org

The UW-Platteville Environmental Engineering Program provides a balance between basic science, engineering science and engineering design. The purpose of the curriculum is to develop in each student a thorough understanding of the underlying environmental principles in the basic sciences along with practical applications in engineering design. Although emphasis is placed upon learning the fundamentals, each student will be encouraged to develop excellent technical and communication skills, become broadly educated and become a productive member of society.The UW-Platteville Environmental Engineering Program is designed to give students a broad background in all areas of environmental engineering. These include water and wastewater treatment, environmental and occupational health, solid waste management, water resources, environmental modeling and environmental chemistry. Practical applications are emphasized with sufficient theory so that the individual can develop innovative solutions as new problems are encountered.

Environmental engineering is the application of scientific and engineering principles to improve and maintain the environment for the protection of human health, nature’s beneficial ecosystems and biodiversity, and for environment-related enhancement of the quality of human life. Through education and experience, environmental engineers develop an understanding of the earth’s biological, chemical, physical and geological systems. They use this information to develop engineering plans for solutions to environmental problems caused by pollution. They also develop pollution prevention plans to keep environmental problems from developing in the first place.

Environmental engineers analyze contaminated streams, lakes, air, soil and groundwater to determine the extent and severity of contamination. These environmental measurements provide the basis for engineers to design treatment and remediation processes to remove and/or degrade pollutants. Environmental scientists and engineers work together with city or county officials, regulatory officials, consultants and nearby residents to achieve a solution to pollution problems.

Environmental Engineering Degree Program Vision, Objectives and Outcomes

Vision

The vision of the UW-Platteville Environmental Engineering Program is to provide the education and training to create citizen engineers who will be leaders in the civil and environmental engineering profession and in their communities.

Citizen engineers are:

  • Able to address technical and non-technical issues
  • Attuned to the needs of their community and nation
  • Able and willing to engage in public policy
  • Appreciative of sustainability
  • Ethical
  • Innovative, but aware of risk
  • Lifelong learners

Program Objectives

In order to achieve the vision of the UW-Platteville Environmental Engineering Program, graduates of the program will:

  1. Effectively and accurately communicate with technical and non-technical audiences
  2. Successfully apply technical knowledge to solve engineering problems to satisfy client, industry and governmental requirements
  3. Have the ability to evaluate projects from a holistic perspective including some or all of the following: sustainability, environmental impacts, ethics, aesthetics, politics, historical perspectives, social impacts, technical needs and costs
  4. Make significant and innovative contributions in their professional endeavors
  5. Become registered professional engineers

The realization of these objectives is expected to occur within five years of graduation. In order to ensure that graduates are adequately prepared to meet these objectives, the UW-Platteville Environmental Engineering Department program outcomes define the competencies that students are expected to demonstrate at graduation.

Program Outcomes

The following program outcomes are designed to produce graduates who will meet the program objectives:

a. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

b. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

c. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

d. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

e. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

f. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

g. an ability to communicate effectively

h. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engisneering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

i. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

j. a knowledge of contemporary issues

k. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Academic Standards

 

 

Program Requirements

A grade of “C-” or higher must be earned in all courses that are prerequisite courses for other CIVILENG courses.

General Requirements Bachelor of Science Degree

Total for graduation132
Major studies101

Majors

CIVILENG 2000 Introduction to Infrastructure 3 Credits

An introduction to the civil infrastructure; social, political, historical, sustainability, and planning implications of infrastructure; introduction to each of the subdiscipline areas of civil and environmental engineering (transportation, environmental, construction, structural, and geotechnical); professional skills (e.g. report writing, oral communication, teamwork).
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: GENENG 1320 or consent of Department Chair
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 2010 Infrastructure and Society 3 Credits

This course will help students understand how infrastructure works, but more importantly, how the infrastructure affects nearly all aspects of human society. Students will synthesize concepts from many areas of social science using infrastructure as a focal point. Specifically, at the end of this course, students will be able to: describe the functions and purposes of the civil infrastructure (public works); explain the interactions between the built environment and the natural environment; describe the social, political, economic, ethical, and environmental considerations involved in infrastructure analysis and design; and create a social impact assessment report for local infrastructure.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: MATH 15; C: ENGLISH 1230
Typically Offered: Fall-ODD

CIVILENG 2220 Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Applications 2 Credits

Engineering problem solving using spreadsheets, MathCAD, and AutoCAD Civil 3D. Spreadsheet and MathCAD applications include graphing, curve fitting, interpolation, modeling, solving linear and non-linear equations, matrix methods, simultaneous equations, etc. Civil 3D applications include creation of topographic maps and determination of earthwork volumes.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: MATH 2640, C: CIVILENG 2000 and CIVILENG 2630
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 2630 Elements of Surveying 3 Credits

General use and care of surveying instruments; elevation determination, horizontal positioning; coordinate systems, topographic and construction surveys, introduction to boundary surveys, horizontal and vertical curves.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: GENENG 1320 or INDUSTDY 1230; C: MATH 2530 or MATH 2450
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 3020 Construction Engineering 3 Credits

Contracts, specifications, legal aspects and associated liabilities of construction documents, site management and planning, introduction to project scheduling and cost estimating, CPM, earthwork calculations and cross sections.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 2000, CIVILENG 2220, and CIVILENG 2630 or COMPUTER 1830
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 3030 Construction Materials 3 Credits

Fundamentals of engineering materials; analysis of aggregate and blending techniques; influences of aggregate mineralogy; analytical instrumentation and testing; introduction to portland cement chemistry; theory and design of portland cement concrete mixtures; bituminous materials and mixes; influences of mix properties on pavement durability. Construction material design projects.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 2000, CIVILENG 2220, CIVILENG 2630 and GENENG 2340
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 3140 Introduction to Structural Engineering 4 Credits

Introduction to code-based structural building design including building loads; load paths through buildings;design of floor beans made of wood, steel, or reinforced concrete; design of main wind force resisting systems including braced steel frames and masonry shear walls; and wood studs exposed to axial load and bending. Broader building design considerations including sustainability, risk, and constructibility are also introduced.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a C- or better in CIVILENG 2000, CIVILENG 2220, and CIVILENG 2630 and GENENG 2340
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 3300 Fluid Mechanics 4 Credits

Fluid properties; statics; ideal and real fluid flow, energy, continuity and momentum equations, laminar and turbulent flow in closed conduits, free surface flow.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 2000, CIVILENG 2220 and CIVILENG 2630 and GENENG 2130
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 3400 Field Methods in Agricultural Hydrology 1 Credit

Exploration of the water budget as it pertains to agro-ecosystems. Field explorations and in-class analysis of rainfall rates, evaporation, transpiration, infiltration, groundwater flow, groundwater quality, stream velocity and flowrate, edge-of-field runoff quantity and quality.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Cross Offering: AGRIC 3400
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 2220 or COMPUTER 1830 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Summer

CIVILENG 3410 Agro-Ecosystem Research 1-3 Credits

Training in research methods, use of scientific literature and evaluation of data; results presented in a written report and oral presentation.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Cross Offering: AGRIC 3410
Typically Offered: Summer

CIVILENG 3530 Transportation Engineering 3 Credits

Introductory overview of transportation systems with emphasis on the highway mode of transportation. Topics include fundamentals of transportation economics, land-use and transportation interaction, elements of transportation planning, traffic operations, concepts of highway locations and geometric design, and introduction to flexible and rigid pavement systems.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 2000, CIVILENG 2220, and CIVILENG 2630
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 3740 Geotechnical Engineering I 4 Credits

Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering, a discipline that includes the study of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering. Soil Mechanics topics of study include: exploration and classification of soils; index properties of soils; soil compaction; effective stress; stresses in soils;shear strength; flow of water in soils; compressibility of soils; lateral earth pressures; and geosynthetics. Foundation Engineering topics of study, which are the areas of expertise in the professional practice of Geotechnical Engineering, include introductions to: foundations and bearing capacity; stability of natural and constructed slopes; retaining walls; and case histories in Geotechnical Engineering. The laboratory component will expose the students to laboratory testing of soils performed as part of the professional practice of Geotechnical Engineering.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: GENENG 2340 and CIVILENG 2000
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 3950 Civil and Environmental Engineering Cooperative Education 4 Credits

Work experience in industry under the direction of the College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science Cooperative Education and Internship Program. During co-op the student is expected to be away from his/her studies at UW-Platteville and work for an industry for a semester and summer. Credits do not fulfill graduation requirements.
Components: Field Studies
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 3970 Civil and Environmental Engineering Internship 1 Credit

Work experience in industry under the direction of the College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science Cooperative Education and Internship Program. NOTE: This program is separate and distinct from the cooperative education program and is principally designed to cover the summer work experience. Internship is designed to provide experiential learning experience to the student during the summer period. Credits do not fulfill graduation requirements.
Components: Field Studies
Typically Offered: Summer

CIVILENG 4020 Construction Estimates and Costs 3 Credits

Methods of estimating, extending and pricing; use of blue prints, specifications and commercial cost sheets to bid a complete project; scheduling and pricing of labor.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3020 or INDUSTDY 2540
Typically Offered: Spring

CIVILENG 4030 Construction Equipment 2 Credits

Excavation methods and equipment; equipments costs; engineering fundamentals; analysis and design of equipment systems; drilling and blasting; material production and safety as they pertain to both heavy construction and surface mining methods.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3020 or INDUSTDY 2540
Typically Offered: Fall

CIVILENG 4040 Construction and Professional Management 3 Credits

Construction management decision making; engineering economic comparisons, scheduling, bidding techniques, introduction to labor agreements, safety and QA/QC.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3020 or INDUSTDY 2540; C: MATH 4030
Typically Offered: Spring

CIVILENG 4100 Computer Analysis of Structures 3 Credits

Finite element theory and application with beam, and truss elements. Introduction to engineering programming with Visual Basic. Introduction to structural dynamics and seismic analysis; optimization, reliability and eigen analysis for structural problems.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: C: CIVILENG 3160
Typically Offered: EVERY/3RD

CIVILENG 4110 Intermediate Structural Engineering 3 Credits

Classical structural analysis methods including virtual work, influence lines, and force-based and displacement-based methods of statically indeterminate analysis. Introduction to the stiffness method and background of structural analysis software. Introduction to use of RISA 2D and 3D structural analysis software. Introduction to bridge design with emphasis on vehicle loads and requirements of the Wisconsin Department of Transportation Bridge Manual.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: CIVILENG 3140
Typically Offered: Fall

CIVILENG 4150 Reinforced Concrete Structures 3 Credits

A technical elective on design of reinforced concrete structures. Code-based design of a variety of common reinforced concrete elements including: beams, one-way slabs, non-slender columns, retaining walls, spread footings, and slabs-on-ground. Course concepts include (but are not limited to) design for strength and serviceability, shear and moment behavior of non-rectangular cross-sections and cross-sections with compression steel, interaction curves for members with axial load and moment, maximum and minimum limits for reinforcement, anchorage of reinforcement, detailing of reinforcement, and incorporation of holistic design considerations such as sustainability, aesthetics, economy, and constructability.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3110 or CIVILENG 3140
Typically Offered: Fall

CIVILENG 4160 Foundation Design 3 Credits

Design of shallow foundations (such as concrete footings) and deep foundations (such as pile foundations and drilled shafts) considering bearing capacity, settlement, and constructability. Subsurface exploration planning and determination of appropriate soil properties. Introduction to ground improvement methods (such as micoropiles, vibro-compaction, dynamic compaction, vertical drains, stone columns, deep soil mixing.)
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in (CIVILENG 3740 and (CIVILENG 3110 or CIVILENG 3140))
Typically Offered: Fall

CIVILENG 4230 Steel Design 3 Credits

Behavior and properties of structural steel, proportioning of members and connections; AISC-LRFD specifications. Integrated design project.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3110 or CIVILENG 3140
Typically Offered: Spring

CIVILENG 4250 Wood Structures 3 Credits

Anisotropic properties of wood; wood connectors; sawn and glulam beams, columns and beam columns; plywood; introduction to code-based seismic design; diaphragms and shear-walls; integrated design project.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3110 or CIVILENG 3140
Typically Offered: EVERY/OTH

CIVILENG 4500 Highway Engineering 3 Credits

Comprehensive design of contemporary highway projects. Emphasis on improving utilization of existing facilities and creating efficient new facilities through transportation system management techniques. Consideration of geometric and intersection design and standards; earthwork computations; design of parking facilities; design of highway surface and subsurface drainage systems; environmental, mobility and community impacts as measures of effectiveness.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3530
Typically Offered: Fall

CIVILENG 4520 Pavement Design and Analysis 3 Credits

Design methodologies for highway pavement structures; theoretical and applied aspects of flexible and rigid pavement design; soil conditions, base, subbase and pavement materials; frost action; economic considerations.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3030, CIVILENG 3530, and CIVILENG 3740
Typically Offered: Spring

CIVILENG 4550 Traffic Engineering 3 Credits

Elements of traffic engineering including road user, vehicle and roadway system; traffic flow theory; traffic studies and data collection; traffic control devices; principles of intersection signalization; capacity and level of service analysis for freeways, rural highways and intersections using state-of-the-art software for traffic operations and management.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3530; C: MATH 4030
Typically Offered: Fall

CIVILENG 4560 Pavement Maintenance and Rehab 2 Credits

Evaluation of pavement distresses and the maintenance techniques used for their repair. Survey and evaluation methods, maintenance equipment and procedures, rehabilitation techniques, and identification of the most cost-effective option. Maintenance management software will be used to evaluate options. Guest speakers will be used for selected topics.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3530 and CIVILENG 3030
Typically Offered: Spring

CIVILENG 4630 Geographic Information Systems 3 Credits

Basic GIS concepts in cartography and digital mapping, geodetic datums and control, map projections and coordinates, databases, topology, spatial queries/analysis, digital orthophotography, digital elevation models, and applications. Use of state-of-the-art software and World Wide Web components for GIS.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 2220 and CIVILENG 2630
Typically Offered: Fall

CIVILENG 4640 Site Design and Stormwater Management 3 Credits

Comparison of conventional to low-impact land development practices in terms of technical (e.g. stormwater quantity and quality, erosion control, transportation), economic, and social aspects. Skills gained include CIVIL 3D, WINSLAMM, and oral and written communication.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: C: ENVENG 4300 or consent of instructor
Typically Offered: Spring

CIVILENG 4730 Geotechnical Engineering II 3 Credits

Review elements of soil mechanics; water in soil; slope stability; lateral earth pressures; sheet pile walls; geotextile applications; computer applications.
Components: Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: a "C-" or better in CIVILENG 3740
Typically Offered: Spring

CIVILENG 4930 Civil and Environmental Engineering Design Project 3 Credits

Open-ended comprehensive design in students area of specialization. Discussion and experience in project management, work as a team, written reports and presentations, computer aided design and ethics.
Components: Laboratory, Class
Prereqs/Coreqs: P: Civil Engineering major and CIVILENG 3020, CIVILENG 3030, (CIVILENG 3110 or CIVILENG 3140), CIVILENG 3300, CIVILENG 3530, CIVILENG 3740 and ENVENG 3340 or Environmental Engineering major and CIVILENG 3300, CIVILENG 3740 and ENVENG 3340
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 4980 Current Topics in Engineering 1-4 Credits

In-depth study of a current topic of interest to the engineering profession. The topic to be covered will be identified in the course title.
Components: Class
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring

CIVILENG 4990 Independent Study 1-3 Credits

Advanced study in area of specialization selected by student and approved by faculty member.
Components: Independent Study
Typically Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer

Faculty and lecturers

Additional information about the Faculty and Lecturers below may be found in the Faculty and Academic Staff section of this catalog.

Bohnhoff, Gretchen L.

Curras, Christina J.

Enz, Daniel

Fields, Kristina

Gribb, Molly M.

Meyers, Mark S.

Owusu-Ababio, Samuel

Parker, Philip J.

Penn, Michael R.

Polebitski, Austin

Schmitt, Robert L.

Thompson, M. Keith

Xiao, Xingqiang